20+ Insane Things From South Korea That Make Us Want to Pack Our Stuff and Go There

In 2019, South Korea took first place on the list of the most innovative countries in the world. Even Singapore, the US, and Japan are behind South Korea. Tourists and other people can see for themselves that the Korean lifestyle is very different from that of any other country. South Korea can be surprising, shocking, and even charming. Some of the details of the South Korean culture are so cool that we’d love to see them implemented in other countries.

Bright Side is sure that photos and facts about life in Seoul and other South Korean cities will allow our readers to learn more about the culture of this country.

“I realized that I’d forgotten my wallet with all my cards near the ATM. I ran back and it was still there. The people in South Korea are very honest.”

An apartment complex in Korea was being painted, so the painters shrouded all the cars in the parking lot to protect them from splatter.

If you park your car in a place where they’re painting something, your car will most likely be “dressed” in such a bag.

This near-perfect nursing room was found in a mall. There’s a kitchen with a water cooler, a fridge, and a microwave oven. There’s also a special room with beds and chairs.

The postman sent a text with a photo that the package was delivered. The package will be there until the receiver gets it. Nobody will touch it.

In beauty product shops, they’ll give you as many samples as you want. In restaurants, they’ll bring as many snacks before the main course for free as you need. They may also offer you free tea, drinks, and desserts!

Dinner in South Korea consists of a great number of plates on the table even if you ordered just one thing.

"Housewarming presents are always the same and they all have meaning. Detergent and soap signify the more foam, the bigger the income. And toilet paper symbolizes all the life difficulties that unwrap just like a toilet paper roll.

Small electric cars are just as popular in South Korea as bicycles are in European countries.

They have to work so much that they don’t always have time to do their hair.

There’s a library at the subway station where you can register with your ID and choose a book to read on the way.

Quite often, you can see cars from under the garage doors. There’s not a lot of free space in Korea, so even the garages aren’t always big enough.

These gender-specific parking spaces in a Korean parking lot are well-lit and there are more cameras providing safety for women.

These transparent pockets allow you to watch movies on your phone while on Seoul busses.

Strips for blackheads for babies — a very odd thing sold in a South Korean supermarket

“This is a local laundry station. I’ve lived in South Korea for 10 years and it’s the first time I’ve seen this here. I was most impressed with the built-in stones/concrete blocks that had grooves in them to be used as washboards.”

“Koreans love stretching and they can do it anywhere: in the office, at a bus stop, or even on the plane — anywhere they can sit for a long time while getting better blood circulation. They love massages and do it in different ways. They also use trees very often for this.”

“We love ’torturing’ our feet. In parks, you can see special paved lanes. Koreans walk on them without shoes to feel better. It’s painful but fun!”

A free Twix holder for when you don’t eat the whole thing

“In South Korea, men are very close and supportive of one another. For example, they often put their hands on the shoulders of their colleagues. They may even massage each other and it’s perfectly normal.”

“A home is a requirement for getting married. Real estate is very expensive and young couples can’t always afford a house. Many people refuse to have a family and live alone.”

In South Korea, a boss’s hobby is important to their employees. The boss often asks employees to do something with them on the weekend. In order to decline, they have to explain what plans they have, what time they’re taking place, and where.

Jeju city has a refreshing site: a parking area that works on an honor system. You just insert enough coins for how long you are planning to park. No electronics, no worker, no tickets, no receipts — just a mutual interest in supporting the city.

What amazes you about the Korean lifestyle and what do you think is too much?

Preview photo credit storpweber / instagram

source: https://brightside.me/